RSS in Education

Oddly enough, I have never used a RSS feed reader.  I have many blogs that I visit regularly, and of course I received tons of update emails that I generally ignore (and the emails fill up my inbox).  Just to save time in my own practice, I am moving my favorite blogs to my Feedly account!  This video definitely sold it to me – I’m more of a netflix guy than a movie rental store guy! (“RSS in Plain English”).  In fact, this video became a part of my lesson plan to use RSS in Education, specifically my AP Statistics course.

I read many great examples of using a RSS feed reader as a source of reading or research materials for students.  Although statistics is a math course, this purpose fits it very nicely.  Both CCSS and College Board expectations specify that students should read, summarize, analyze, and critique reports and data.  However, my original idea for a student with a Feedly account did not pan out.  I found techniques of creating a RSS feed based on a Google Scholar search.  However, these techniques are outdated and no longer supported.  I would really like to find a way to do this, if it is possible.  Being able to have scholarly articles updated in a RSS feed would provide a more rigorous assignment.

For now, I discovered lists of statistics related blogs that students can use to read about or analyze data.  I placed the links into a shared Symbaloo Webmix.  Students will browse through the links and select at least three to be added to their Feedly accounts.  Students will also add all of their classmates’ stat class blogs.  On a weekly basis, students will select a post from a student and from another source to read and critique.  Read my complete lesson plan here.  Any comments or suggestions are greatly appreciated – I will definitely be implementing this lesson and assignments in my AP Statistics course this fall.

Feel free to view my “Setting Up Feedly” screencast.  This video is a part of the “flipped” instruction from my lesson plan.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s